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dc.contributor.author
Biskas, Vasileios
en
dc.date.accessioned
2015-06-03T07:56:16Z
dc.date.available
2015-09-27T05:56:36Z
dc.date.issued
2015-06-03
dc.identifier.uri
https://repository.ihu.edu.gr//xmlui/handle/11544/147
dc.rights
Default License
dc.title
Energy, growth, corruption and institution
en
heal.type
masterThesis
heal.language
en
heal.access
free
el
heal.license
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
heal.recordProvider
School of Science and Technology, MSc in Energy Systems
heal.publicationDate
2015-03
heal.bibliographicCitation
Biskas Vasileios, 2014, Energy, growth, corruption and institution, Master's Dissertation, International Hellenic University
en
heal.abstract
This dissertation is written as a part of the MSc in Energy Systems. This study investigates if the presence of corruption or poor institutions has any effect on promoting the renewable energy. Alternative models including corruption and institutional estimates among the main drivers promoting renewable energy are estimated. A set of eighty countries with yearly data from 2001 to 2011 is being used. Panel data methodology of Fixed Effects and Random Effects is being applied. With the estimation of different models that include the corruption and institutional estimates we demonstrate the main drivers of the renewable energy. The main drivers of renewables are estimated to be the share of the common energy resources and the GDP per capita. The CO2 emission per capita, the energy use per capita, the growth of GDP and the share of energy imports are not estimated as significant drivers for the renewables. Regarding the corruptions and the institutional estimates, only the Government effectiveness was proven to have a significant negative link with the share of renewables. The links between the CPI, the Control of Corruption and the Government Effectiveness are presented but they are not found significant.
en
heal.tableOfContents
ABSTRACT ................................................................................................. 2 1. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................... 3 2. LITERATURE REVIEW ............................................................................. 4 3. METHODOLOGY ................................................................................... 8 3.1 Panel estimation ........................................................................................ 8 3.2 Fixed and Random effects ........................................................................... 10 3.3 Fixed Effects .......................................................................................... 10 3.4 Random Effects ....................................................................................... 10 3.5 Hypothesis Testing ................................................................................... 11 4. DATA .............................................................................................. 13 4.1 Sources ................................................................................................. 13 4.2 Descriptive Statistics ................................................................................. 14 5. RESULTS .......................................................................................... 17 6. CONCLUSIONS ................................................................................... 32 7. REFERENCES ..................................................................................... 35
en
heal.advisorName
Sartzetakis, Eftichios
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Sartzetakis, Eftichios S.
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Dergiades
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Psychogios
en
heal.academicPublisher
School of Science &Technology, Master of Science (MSc) in Energy Systems
en
heal.academicPublisherID
ihu
heal.numberOfPages
40
heal.fullTextAvailability
true


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