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dc.contributor.author
Thoua, Effrosyni
en
dc.date.accessioned
2017-05-04T07:10:38Z
en
dc.date.available
2017-05-09T00:00:26Z
dc.date.issued
2017-05-04
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dc.identifier.uri
https://repository.ihu.edu.gr//xmlui/handle/11544/15283
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dc.rights
Default License
en
dc.subject
War crimes
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dc.subject
International criminal law
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dc.title
War Crimes Against Cultural Property
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heal.type
masterThesis
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heal.creatorID.email
efi.thoua@gmail.com
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heal.keywordURI.LCSH
Cultural property--Protection
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heal.keywordURI.LCSH
Cultural property--Protection (International law)
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heal.keywordURI.LCSH
War crimes
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heal.keywordURI.LCSH
War (International law)
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heal.keywordURI.LCSH
International criminal law
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heal.keywordURI.LCSH
Culture and law
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heal.language
en
en
heal.access
free
en_US
heal.license
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
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heal.recordProvider
School of Economics, Business Administration and Legal Studies, MA in Art, Law and Economy
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heal.publicationDate
2017-05-02
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heal.abstract
This dissertation was written as part of the MA in Art Law and Economy at the International Hellenic University. The research question of this study is to comparatively analyze the most significant international criminal provisions, which establish individual criminal responsibility for war crimes against cultural property. The initial step is to elaborate on the normative origins of the relevant customary IHL principles, with the purpose of conceiving the very substance of the criminal provisions. The critical analysis is further justified through an established theoretical construction of distinction among the international legal instruments, on the ground of their specific characteristics. The civilian-use approach followed by the ad hoc criminal tribunals and the international permanent criminal court has proved to be less successful in comparison to the cultural-value orientation of the 1999 Second Protocol. The responsibility to protect cultural objects is evident also in the context of an occupation regime. In this regard, reference is made to judgements of domestic jurisdiction, which reveal the acknowledgement of the legal obligation of an occupying power to protect the national treasures of the occupied state.
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heal.advisorName
Prof. Sarigiannidis, Miltiadis
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heal.committeeMemberName
Dr. Zervaki, Antonia
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heal.committeeMemberName
Prof. Perraki, Paraskevi
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heal.academicPublisher
IHU
en
heal.academicPublisherID
ihu
en
heal.numberOfPages
52
en


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