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dc.contributor.author
Chrimatopoulos, Vasileios
en
dc.date.accessioned
2018-05-16T09:55:55Z
dc.date.available
2018-05-17T00:00:16Z
dc.date.issued
2018-05-16
dc.identifier.uri
https://repository.ihu.edu.gr//xmlui/handle/11544/29119
dc.rights
Default License
dc.subject
History & Archaeology of Classical Macedonia
en
dc.title
Macedonia & the Macedonians via the Sources: in the Classical Period
en
heal.type
masterThesis
en_US
heal.secondaryTitle
in the Classical Period
en
heal.creatorID.URI
https://ihu-gr.academia.edu/VasilisChrimatopoulos
heal.creatorID.email
vas61gr@yahoo.gr
heal.generalDescription
Historical events in order to be attested and examined by scholars have to derive from some kind of evidence. Such evidence is provided by primordial sources of any kind. It might be a papyrus, an inscription, a votive relief or an archaeological find that may attest to a historical event. It is like watching an event through the eye of those who really lived in it. Objectivity is such a subjective issue that is formed not only by the author who composes a historical document but also by the reader who pores into the document. There is not an existing frame of truth but only a common perception of it. Therefore, in order to provide an academic paper on history one has to consider what was commonly accepted at the specific period examined. Certainly, it is not always easy to come down with such evidence deriving from different sources but in many cases such paradigms do exist. Historians, orators or even the tragic poets may provide us with such evidence and todays scholars are challenged to accumulate, compare them and reach to a safe conclusion (when examining a historical event or even history itself). In order to achieve a safe conclusion there are several factors one has to take under great consideration. Such ware: 1. Credibility of the author. This can be achieved by investigating the authors intentions when writing about an event. Where or how the author obtained the sources of his work? 2. Intended audience. What kind of audience is the author addressing to? 3. Objective reasoning. Is the piece of the information covered by facts, opinions or propaganda? 4. Coverage. Does the work update other sources, earlier than his period of leaving? Is the material primary or secondary in nature? Was the document an edition or a revision of earlier sources? 5. Writing style. Is the work of the author organized logically? Are the main points or the events presented clearly? The main subject of this dissertation paper shall cover the following subject: what was the image of the Macedonian Kingdom by the southern Greeks during the Classical period. How this image is depicted to us nowadays when studying the primordial sources. How were the Macedonians perceiving themselves, leaving in the fringe of the Helladic space? Furthermore, it shall be cover all the later and the updated historical data through the primordial sources available. Unfortunately, the oldest sources derive mostly in non-Macedonian attestations (historians, orators, tragic poets, epigraphs etc.). Only a few attestations have been recovered from the Macedonian region. After a, thorough discussion on the subject with Professor Xydopoulos, we came up with the idea of covering the subject as mentioned. I am most thankful to Mr. Xydopoulos and the Dr. of archaeology Maria Girtzi for concluding to the specific subject which not only is greatly interesting as a challenge for me but moreover will be of a great interest aswell. Prof. Xydopoulos accepted to be recruited as the supervisor of the whole project. For that, I am greatly pleased not only because he is an eminent scholar but also due to the fact that he is approachable as a person and as a friend. With those two mentors (Xydopoulos and Girtzi) and their assistance, I am certain that the result will excel my expectations.
en
heal.classification
History & Archaeology of Classical Macedonia (Humanities)
en
heal.keywordURI.LCSH
Macedonia--History--To 168 B.C.
heal.contributorID.email
vas61gr@yahoo.gr
heal.language
en
en_US
heal.access
free
en_US
heal.license
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
en_US
heal.recordProvider
School of Humanities, MA in the Classical Archaeology and the Ancient History of Macedonia
en_US
heal.publicationDate
2018-05-13
heal.abstract
Historical events in order to be attested and examined by scholars have to derive from some kind of evidence. Such evidence is provided by primordial sources of any kind. It might be a papyrus, an inscription, a votive relief or an archaeological find that may attest to a historical event. It is like watching an event through the eye of those who really lived in it. Objectivity is such a subjective issue that is formed not only by the author who composes a historical document but also by the reader who pores into the document. There is not an existing frame of truth but only a common perception of it. Therefore, in order to provide an academic paper on history one has to consider what was commonly accepted at the specific period examined. Certainly, it is not always easy to come down with such evidence deriving from different sources but in many cases such paradigms do exist. Historians, orators or even the tragic poets may provide us with such evidence and todays scholars are challenged to accumulate, compare them and reach to a safe conclusion (when examining a historical event or even history itself). In order to achieve a safe conclusion there are several factors one has to take under great consideration. Such ware: 1. Credibility of the author. This can be achieved by investigating the authors intentions when writing about an event. Where or how the author obtained the sources of his work? 2. Intended audience. What kind of audience is the author addressing to? 3. Objective reasoning. Is the piece of the information covered by facts, opinions or propaganda? 4. Coverage. Does the work update other sources, earlier than his period of leaving? Is the material primary or secondary in nature? Was the document an edition or a revision of earlier sources? 5. Writing style. Is the work of the author organized logically? Are the main points or the events presented clearly? The main subject of this dissertation paper shall cover the following subject: what was the image of the Macedonian Kingdom by the southern Greeks during the Classical period. How this image is depicted to us nowadays when studying the primordial sources. How were the Macedonians perceiving themselves, leaving in the fringe of the Helladic space? Furthermore, it shall be cover all the later and the updated historical data through the primordial sources available. Unfortunately, the oldest sources derive mostly in non-Macedonian attestations (historians, orators, tragic poets, epigraphs etc.). Only a few attestations have been recovered from the Macedonian region. After a, thorough discussion on the subject with Professor Xydopoulos, we came up with the idea of covering the subject as mentioned. I am most thankful to Mr. Xydopoulos and the Dr. of archaeology Maria Girtzi for concluding to the specific subject which not only is greatly interesting as a challenge for me but moreover will be of a great interest aswell. Prof. Xydopoulos accepted to be recruited as the supervisor of the whole project. For that, I am greatly pleased not only because he is an eminent scholar but also due to the fact that he is approachable as a person and as a friend. With those two mentors (Xydopoulos and Girtzi) and their assistance, I am certain that the result will excel my expectations.
el
heal.tableOfContents
ABSTRACT III PREFACE I CONTENTS III INTRODUCTION 5 1. THE EARLIEST SOURCES 9. HESIOD 9. 2. HISTORIANS OF ΤΗΕ 5TH CENTURY BC 12. ANALYZING THE EVIDENCE 19. 3. HISTORIANS OF ΤΗΕ 4TH CENTURY BC 24. CONCLUSIONS 40. 4. THE MACEDONIAN DIALECT 41. 5. EPIGRAPHIC EVIDENCE 48. EPIGRAPHIC EVIDENCE ON THE CULTURAL AND SOCIAL LIFE OF THE MACEDONIANS 48 CONCLUSIONS 58 BIBLIOGRAPHY 60.
el
heal.advisorName
Xydopoulos, Ioannis
el
heal.committeeMemberName
Akamatis, Nikolaos
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Xydopoulos, Ioannis
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Manoledakis, Manolis
en
heal.academicPublisher
IHU
en
heal.academicPublisherID
ihu
en_US
heal.numberOfPages
67
en_US


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