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dc.contributor.author
Sporidou, Kalliopi
en
dc.date.accessioned
2019-04-17T12:50:09Z
dc.date.available
2019-04-18T00:00:23Z
dc.date.issued
2019-04-17
dc.identifier.uri
https://repository.ihu.edu.gr//xmlui/handle/11544/29379
dc.rights
Default License
dc.subject
Peri-urban agriculture
en
dc.subject
Environment
en
dc.title
Review of urban and peri-urban agriculture. Effects on environment, economy, society.
en
heal.type
masterThesis
en_US
heal.creatorID.email
k.sporidou@ihu.edu.gr
heal.generalDescription
With regard to the many benefits and barriers of urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA) on environment, economy and society, this dissertation examines the feasibility of UPA to act as a sustainable measure of adaptation to climate change as well as its potential contribution to climate change mitigation.
en
heal.language
en
en_US
heal.access
free
en_US
heal.license
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
en_US
heal.recordProvider
School of Economics, Business Administration and Legal Studies, MSc in Environmental Management and Sustainability
en_US
heal.publicationDate
2019-04-17
heal.abstract
This dissertation was written as part of the MSc in Environmental Management and Sustainability at the International Hellenic University. Urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA) refers to agriculture done in urban areas or/and in close proximity to urban areas, either practiced on small, semi- or large scale (FAO, 2018a). UPA presents a chance to increase food production in cities. This could reduce poverty, unemployment and enhance food security, especially in developing countries. In combination with sustainable land use and green infrastructure, UPA can also become a potential mitigation and adaptation strategy for climate change (Zazada, et al., 2018). UPA is by many scholars considered as an opportunity for adaptation to growing urbanization. In many high-income countries people start to discover the neglected beauty of vegetable gardens and balconies, the joy of farming, the opportunity for social contact and the resulting exercise. Many well-off urban dwellers feel uncomfortable with the idea that they have to consume goods, produced with the use of chemicals by unknown people, transported over long distances (Autio, et al., 2013) and increasingly prefer freshly, local harvested food. Today, many are embracing UPA as a new concept despite being an old phenomenon (Beed, et al., 2015). Around the world, local food movements, grassroots initiatives, seed exchange networks, healthy city networks, often in collaboration with policy makers, strive to greening the cities, lessen their environmental impacts, increase urban sustainability and resilience to climate change (MUFPP, 2015). Yet, the vast majority of UPA is driven by necessity, not leisure.
en
heal.advisorName
Michailidou, Alexandra
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Bochtis, Dionysis
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Mavragani, Eleni
en
heal.academicPublisher
IHU
en
heal.academicPublisherID
ihu
en_US


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