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dc.contributor.author
Baou, Anastasia
en
dc.date.accessioned
2020-05-19T11:15:20Z
dc.date.available
2020-05-20T00:00:59Z
dc.date.issued
2020-05-19
dc.identifier.uri
https://repository.ihu.edu.gr//xmlui/handle/11544/29422
dc.rights
Default License
dc.title
Byzantium and the Seljuks: Cultural exchange and interaction
en
heal.type
masterThesis
en_US
heal.keywordURI.LCSH
Byzantium
heal.keywordURI.LCSH
Seljuks
heal.keywordURI.LCSH
Cultural exchange
heal.keywordURI.LCSH
Cultural interaction
heal.language
en
en_US
heal.access
free
en_US
heal.license
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
en_US
heal.recordProvider
School of Humanities, MA in Black Sea & Eastern Mediterranean Studies
en_US
heal.publicationDate
2019-05-13
heal.abstract
This dissertation is written as part of the MSc in the Black Sea and Eastern Mediterranean at the International Hellenic University. It is set in the period of the Seljuk conquests of Asia Minor, a time which almost coincides with the formation of a general European policy. A brief discussion of the internal and external affairs of the Byzantine Empire is attempted, before several degrees of cultural interaction and integration are discussed with a special focus on artistic and architectural expression. Due to its strategic geopolitical position, Asia Minor has always been a melting pot for trends and elements of diverse provenance. The Seljuks, representing the cultural “other”, have acted as living vehicles; their gradual settlement and incorporation has eventually transformed Anatolia. Conduct of war, institutions and artistic features derive from the steppes, where the turkic tribes descended from. A brief historical introduction of the world of nomadic tribes, until their contact with the world of Islam in Central Asia is thus, necessary and it is also expected to contribute to the semiology of symbols inocculated into Iranian Art and Architecture, which the Seljuks have disseminated. None of this wouldn’t have been possible, without the support and guidance of my supervisor, Professor P. Androudis, who started us with his inspirational courses on Byzantium and Islam at the IHU. My gratitude to Professors, M. Manoledakis for his panoramic courses on the Black Sea, G. Giannakopoulos and G. Aristodemou for the enlightening courses on the Hellenistic Kingdoms and Roman Empire, S. Dimitriades for the cosmopilitan view of the post Middle Ages Mediterranean, J. Michailidis and G. Antoniou for population movements and research, Fl. Karagianni, who encouraged my interests, assigning me the essay Byzantium and the Arabs, N. Akamatis and Dr Kordosis for valuable advice; Professors H. Ahrweiler, K. Fotiades, P. Gordon, M. Nystazopoulou- Pelekidou, P. Roilos and J. Rupnic for their encouragement and orientation of my research interests; G. Roidouli and K. Xenitopoulou of the library for their excellent help; The Ministry of Rural Development and Food for granting me the scholarship for my studies. All errors and omissions are completely my own responsibility.
en
heal.advisorName
Androudis, Paschalis
el
heal.committeeMemberName
Assembly, General
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Androudis, Paschalis
el
heal.academicPublisher
IHU
el
heal.academicPublisherID
ihu
en_US


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