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dc.contributor.author
Chantavaridou, Christiana
en
dc.date.accessioned
2020-06-04T11:04:21Z
dc.date.available
2020-06-05T00:00:38Z
dc.date.issued
2020-06-04
dc.identifier.uri
https://repository.ihu.edu.gr//xmlui/handle/11544/29491
dc.rights
Default License
dc.subject
Polygamy
en
dc.subject
Marriage alliances
en
dc.subject
Prominent women
en
dc.subject
Projection of monarchy
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dc.subject
Divinity
en
dc.title
Women and power in the court of Philip II
en
heal.type
masterThesis
en_US
heal.creatorID.email
c.chantavaridou@ihu.edu.gr
heal.language
en
en_US
heal.access
free
en_US
heal.license
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
en_US
heal.recordProvider
School of Humanities, MA in the Classical Archaeology and the Ancient History of Macedonia
en_US
heal.publicationDate
2020-01-25
heal.bibliographicCitation
Christiana Chantavaridou, Women and power in the court of Philip II, School of Humanities: MA in the Classical Archaeology and Ancient History of Macedonia, International Hellenic University, 2020
en
heal.abstract
This dissertation was written as part of the MA in Classical Archaeology and Ancient History of Macedonia aiming to enlighten the reasons for Philip II’s marital policy and provide information in relation to royal Macedonian women in his court. Philip II was the third out of the three sons of Amyntas III of the Argead dynasty, who ruled the kingdom of Macedonia from the backwater of the Hellenic world. Prior to his reign the kingdom was weak, unstable, possessing an impotent army that could not deal with their many aggressive enemies. His ascendance to the throne, his innovations during his reign and his multiple marriages were crucial for the transformation and expansion of Macedonia. Early in his reign he took five wives, part of his marriage policy to form alliances, aiming also to produce quickly male heirs to the throne. Two more weddings followed, the last one with a Macedonian noble probably of Argive descent that took place a little time before his assassination in 336 BC. All these royal women, including his mother queen Eurydice, his daughters and granddaughters seemed to play an important role in his monarchy and in shaping their dynasty’s image. Even his divinity was implied to project this image. Anyhow, his polygamy has possibly caused problems in his court and could be a reason for his assassination. Olympias, mother of his son Alexander and seemingly successor to his throne, was projected by some ancient authors, especially by Justin, as the mastermind behind his murder. The work of another ancient author, Plutarch’s Life of Alexander appears to have some elements in contrast with Alexander Romance, an epistolic novel with many alterations. What was the mirroring of these royal Macedonian women in these two?
el
heal.advisorName
Xydopoulos, Ioannis
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Paschidis, Paschalis
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Akamatis, Nikolaos
el
heal.academicPublisher
IHU
en
heal.academicPublisherID
ihu
en_US
heal.spatialCoverage
Macedonia
en
heal.spatialCoverage
Ancient Greece
el
heal.spatialCoverage
Upper Macedonia
el
heal.spatialCoverage
Illyria
el
heal.spatialCoverage
Thessaly
el
heal.spatialCoverage
Molossia
el


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