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dc.contributor.author
Gbandi, Emmanouela
en
dc.date.accessioned
2015-06-15T11:41:01Z
dc.date.available
2015-09-27T05:57:40Z
dc.date.issued
2015-06-15
dc.identifier.uri
https://repository.ihu.edu.gr//xmlui/handle/11544/348
dc.rights
Default License
dc.title
Adolescent Drivers of Social Support In Facebook
en
heal.type
masterThesis
heal.keyword
Internet users
en
heal.keyword
Internet and families
en
heal.keyword
Communication--Network analysis
en
heal.keyword
Online social networks
en
heal.keyword
Online social networks--Psychological aspects
en
heal.keyword
Online social networks--Research
en
heal.keyword
Online social networks--Security measures
en
heal.keyword
Online social networks--Social aspects
en
heal.keyword
Dissertations, Academic
en
heal.language
en
heal.access
free
el
heal.license
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
heal.recordProvider
School of Economics, Business Administration and Legal Studies, MSc in Management
heal.publicationDate
2011-10
heal.bibliographicCitation
Gbandi Emmanouela ,2011, Adolescent Drivers of Social Support In Facebook. ,Master's Dissertation, International Hellenic University
en
heal.abstract
The provision of social support in third places has been widely studied by many of scholars in a variety of service settings (Jøsang et al., 2007; Dossani and Kenney, 2007; Rosenbaum, 2007). Traditional third places were defined by Oldenburg (1989) as social surroundings away from home or work. Similar environments hosting social interactions can also exist online, mainly as social networking sites. These settings are frequently visited by adolescents, which constitute the fastest growing user segment of those websites. The present study aimed to investigate this new type of setting, called ‘”e-third place”, seeking to find the factors that drive adolescents to seek social support in this setting. To this end, ten family disruptive incidents - that have been recorded to retrospectively affect adult behaviors (Moschis, 2007; Roberts et al., 2003a; Rindfleisch et al., 1997) - were utilized. Additionally, this study aimed to investigate future customer behavioral intentions deriving from this support provision. One of the most popular social networking sites in Europe, Facebook, was utilized as a research setting, while the age limits of the research population were set at 13 to 18 years old. The study utilized a survey questionnaire, the results of which were analyzed using quantitative, statistical methods. Results of the statistical analysis indicated that there is no statistically significant impact of the family disruptive events on the adolescents’ need for social support in Facebook. Nevertheless, those events seem to have an impact on some aspects of family communication, indicating that they might have an indirect impact on an adolescent’s need for social support. Additionally, the provision of such a support results in intensified use of Facebook, as well as feelings of increased customer satisfaction and propensity to generate positive word of mouth. More particularly, all three types of social support (instrumental, companionship and emotional support) are positively correlated with the time spent daily on Facebook activities. The provision of companionship and instrumental support positively impacts customer satisfaction, while positive word of mouth derives from the provision of companionship and emotional support. As regards the managerial implications of these findings, the present study confirms that managers should facilitate the provision of social support as it can contribute towards the financial success of the business.
en
heal.tableOfContents
Abstract 6 Acknowledgments 6 Chapter 1: Introduction 1.1 Introduction 7 1.2 Research gap 8 1.2.1 Aims of the study 9 1.3 Overview 10 Chapter 2: Conceptual Framework and Hypothesis Development 2.1 Introduction 11 2.2 Adolescence and behavioral changes 11 2.3 Social media use and adolescents 11 2.4 Social media as third places 12 2.5 Social support in third places 13 2.6 Hypothesis development 14 2.6.1 Theoretical framework hypotheses 14 2.6.2 Business implications hypotheses 17 2.6 Chapter summary 19 Chapter 3: Research Methodology 3.1 Introduction 21 3.2 Research setting 21 3.3 Age selection 21 3.4 Methodology 22 3.5 Sampling and data collection 24 3.6 Tools for statistical analysis 25 3.7 Chapter summary 25 Chapter 4: Results 4.1 Introduction 26 4.2 Demographic composition 26 4.3 Reliability testing 28 4.4 Descriptive statistics 29 4.5 Hypotheses testing 31 4.6 Chapter summary 43 3 Chapter 5: Discussion and conclusions 5.1 Introduction 43 5.2 Discussion 43 5.3 Conclusions 44 5.4 Chapter summary 47 Chapter 6: Managerial implications, limitations and directions for further research 6.1 Introduction 48 6.2 Managerial implications 48 6.3 Limitations 49 6.4 Directions for further research 50 6.5 Chapter summary 51 APPENDIX 52 Bibliography 60
en
heal.advisorName
Grougiou, Vassiliki
de
heal.committeeMemberName
Andriopoulos, Costas
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Gotsi, Manto
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Argouslidis, Paris
en
heal.academicPublisher
School of Economics, Business Administration and Legal Studies, MSc in Management
en
heal.academicPublisherID
ihu
heal.numberOfPages
72
heal.fullTextAvailability
true


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