GR Semicolon EN

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.author
Thymianidis, Michail
en
dc.date.accessioned
2015-06-15T12:39:15Z
dc.date.available
2015-09-27T05:57:44Z
dc.date.issued
2015-06-15
dc.identifier.uri
https://repository.ihu.edu.gr//xmlui/handle/11544/357
dc.rights
Default License
dc.title
Modern additive manufacturing technologies
en
heal.type
masterThesis
heal.keyword
Manufacturing processes--Automation
en
heal.keyword
Manufacturing processes--Computer simulation
en
heal.keyword
Manufacturing processes--Technological innovations
en
heal.keyword
Dissertations, Academic
en
heal.language
en
heal.access
free
el
heal.license
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
heal.recordProvider
School of Economics, Business Administration and Legal Studies, MSc in Management
heal.publicationDate
2012-10-14
heal.bibliographicCitation
Thymianidis Michail, 2012, Modern additive manufacturing technologies : merit and impact on supply chain design , Master's Dissertation, International Hellenic University
en
heal.abstract
In the last fifteen years the mass production of the modern industry has been shifted to third world countries, especially Asia. European firms are faced with the need to promptly adjust towards the fabrication of low volume custom-made products with high added value by developing new advanced manufacturing technologies. Additive manufacturing (AM) is an advanced technology that could enhance manufacturing. In particular, with the use of AM technology products are manufactured by building up thin layers of materials from digitized three-dimensional (3D) designs virtually constructed using advanced 3D Computer-Aided Design software. This free form fabrication enhances the design potential, allowing end-products to comply with functionality thus pushing the boundaries of manufacturability. The impact of AM technologies on supply chains could be massive since shrinkage of the product development cycles and development costs can be achieved along with rapid innovation cycles. Additionally, novel product concepts can be pursued since cost and time to prototype and manufacture are diminished. The potential is almost endless, making tremendously flexible the small-batch manufacture firms in the event they pursue domestic advanced manufacturing. The aim of this paper is firstly provide a state of the art synthesis of AM technology, their limitations, their adoption rate by various industrial sectors and secondly to outline their emerging impact on supply chain design and management. Finally, a methodological framework is proposed which combines Multi Criteria Decision Aid (MCDA) together with Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA) in order to serve as a decision-making tool for the determination of an optimal production strategy.
en
heal.tableOfContents
Abstract………………………………………………………………………………......... Acknowledgements………………………………………………………………………... Table of Contents………………………………………………………………………….. Table of Illustrations…………………………………………………………………......... -List of tables……………………………………………………………………......... -List of Figures……………………………………………………………………….. III IV V VI VI VII Chapter 1: Introduction……………………………………………………………......... 1.1 History and definition of Additive Manufacturing……………………………….. 1.2 Additive Manufacturing process chain………………………………………........ 1 1 2 Chapter 2: Literature review……………………………………………………………. 2.1 Additive Manufacturing Technological Processes……………………………….. 2.1.1 Stereolithography (SL)…………………………………………………….. 2.1.2 Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM)……………………………………….. 2.1.3 Ink Jet Printing (IJP)……………………………………………………….. 2.1.4 Three Dimensional Printing (3DP)………………………………………… 2.1.5 Selective Laser Sintering (SLS)…………………………………………… 2.1.6 Selective Laser Melting (SLM)……………………………………………. 2.1.7 Electron Beam Melting (EBM)……………………………………………. 2.1.8 Direct Metal Deposition (DMD)…………………………………...……… 2.1.9 Laminated Object Manufacturing (LOM)…………………………………. 2.2 Technology Limitations and Design Restrictions………………………………... 2.3 Adoption of Additive Manufacturing by Industry……………………………….. 2.4 Impact of Additive Manufacturing on Supply Chain Design and Management…. 4 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 14 15 16 18 Chapter 3: Methodological Approach………………………….………………………. 3.1 The Methodological Framework…………………………………………………. 3.2 Multi Criteria Decision Aid………………………………………………………. 3.3 Data Envelopment Analysis…………………………………………………….... Chapter 4: Application of the Methodological Framework…………………………... 4.1 Problem formulation and determination of critical SKUs………………………... 4.2 Determination of alternative processes…………………………………………… 4.3 Determination of criteria, weights and thresholds………………………………... 4.4 Distillation results and final rankings…………………………………………….. 4.5 Data Envelopment Analysis results………………………………………………. Chapter 5: Conclusion…………………………………………………………………… References............................................................................................................................ Appendix……………………………………………………………......………………… 23 23 25 28 31 31 36 45 49 57 62 64 70
en
heal.advisorName
Iakovou, Eleftherios
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Iakovou, Eleftherios
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Katsaliaki, Korina
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Vlachos, Dimitrios
en
heal.academicPublisher
School of Economics, Business Administration and Legal Studies, MSc in Management
en
heal.academicPublisherID
ihu
heal.numberOfPages
84
heal.fullTextAvailability
true


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Related Items