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dc.contributor.author
Keramidas, Alexandros
en
dc.date.accessioned
2015-06-18T11:25:40Z
dc.date.available
2015-09-27T05:58:00Z
dc.date.issued
2015-06-18
dc.identifier.uri
https://repository.ihu.edu.gr//xmlui/handle/11544/419
dc.rights
Default License
dc.title
Life cycle analysis of transparent building elements
en
heal.type
masterThesis
heal.keyword
Building
en
heal.keyword
Transparency in architecture
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heal.keyword
Dissertations, Academic
en
heal.language
en
heal.access
free
el
heal.license
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
heal.recordProvider
School of Science and Technology, MSc in Energy Systems
heal.publicationDate
2012-10
heal.bibliographicCitation
Keramidas Alexandros, 2012, Life cycle analysis of transparent building elements ,Master's Dissertation, International Hellenic University
en
heal.abstract
This dissertation was written as a part of the MSc in Energy Systems at the International Hellenic University. It focuses on the environmental performance of four widely used frame materials in the market: aluminum, PVC, wood and wood-metal, all sealed with a double-glazed unit, which are very common in construction sector. Life cycle assessment is the method used to analyze and examine the environmental burdens of each frame case respectively, taking into account production, disposal and transportation of the materials used for the manufacturing of those window systems. The continuous growing of environmental concern and the direction of protective policies are the motivations for such studies. The SimaPro 7 LCA software was used and the CML 2 baseline assessment method was applied to evaluate windows performance. The data needed for the analysis is taken from previous studies, industrial reports and Ecoinvent database if no other source is available. Ten impact categories were grouped and identified to assess the environmental performance of windows, scale-based on CML2 method and followed by all relevant characterization and damage factors. Finally the results were compared to conclude with useful and reliable as possible information for decision makers. To this point I would like to note what a great pleasure for me was to undertake such an interesting and up to date subject. I would like to thank my family and friends for their support, especially Benjamin Christiaens who as a friend contributed the most and helped to fulfill this thesis. Finally I would like to extremely thank my supervisor Dr. Dimitrios Anastaselos for the whole cooperation and assistance in all sectors of my study.
en
heal.tableOfContents
ABSTRACT .............................................................................................................. III 1. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................. 6 1.1. THE WINDOW CASE ........................................................................................... 7 1.2. ENERGY RATING WINDOWS .............................................................................. 7 1.3. LABELING WINDOWS ........................................................................................ 8 1.4. ORGANIZATION ............................................................................................... 10 2. LITERATURE OF REVIEW .................................................................................... 11 2.1. LCA DEFINITION ............................................................................................... 11 2.2. FRAME MATERIALS BRIEF DESCRIPTION ......................................................... 13 2.2.1. FRAME MATERIALS ............................................................................. 14 2.2.2. WINDOW AND GLAZING SYSTEMS ..................................................... 16 2.2.3. ANATOMY OF MODERN WINDOW ..................................................... 18 2.3. STATE OF THE ART ........................................................................................... 19 3. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT METHOD..................................................................... 33 3.1. SCOPE AND GOAL DEFINITION ........................................................................ 36 3.1.1. SCOPE .................................................................................................. 36 3.1.2. GOAL ................................................................................................... 36 3.1.3. FUNCTIONAL UNIT .............................................................................. 37 3.1.4. SYSTEM BOUNDARIES ......................................................................... 38 3.1.5. DATA QUALITY .................................................................................... 39 3.2. LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY(LCI) ............................................................................ 40 3.2.1. KEY STEPS OF A LIFE-CYCLE INVENTORY ............................................. 42 3.2.2. LCI DATA AVAILABILITY AND VALIDATION .......................................... 43 3.3. LIFE CYCLE IMPACT ASSESSMENT(LCIA) .......................................................... 44 3.3.1. LCI DATA AVAILABILITY AND VALIDATION .......................................... 45 [5] 3.3.2. LCIA STEPS ........................................................................................... 51 3.4. LIFE-CYCLE INTERPRETATION .......................................................................... 58 3.4.1. LIFE-CYCLE INTERPRETATION KEY STEPS............................................. 59 4. SCOPE AND OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY ............................................................... 63 4.1. FUNCTIONAL UNIT .......................................................................................... 64 4.2. BOUNDARIES-ASSUMPTIONS ......................................................................... 65 4.3. SIMAPRO ......................................................................................................... 66 4.3.1. ECOINVENT DATABASE ....................................................................... 67 5. ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF WINDOW FRAMES .................................. 69 5.1. ALUMINUM FRAME ......................................................................................... 69 5.2. PVC FRAME ...................................................................................................... 76 5.3. WOODEN FRAME ............................................................................................ 82 5.4. WOOD-METAL FRAME .................................................................................... 87 5.5. WINDOW FRAMES COMPARISON ................................................................... 91 6. ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GLAZING ................................................. 92 6.1. GLAZING UNIT ................................................................................................. 93 7. CONCLUSIONS .................................................................................................. 97 REFERENCES ........................................................................................................... 99
en
heal.advisorName
Anastaselos, Prof. Dimitrios
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Prof. Papadopoulos
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Dr. Anastaselos
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Dr. Martinopoulos
en
heal.academicPublisher
School of Science &Technology, Master of Science (MSc) in Energy Systems
en
heal.academicPublisherID
ihu
heal.numberOfPages
101
heal.fullTextAvailability
true


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