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dc.contributor.author
Elefterescu, Alexandru Cristian
en
dc.date.accessioned
2015-07-06T11:51:31Z
dc.date.available
2015-09-27T06:05:20Z
dc.date.issued
2015-07-06
dc.identifier.uri
https://repository.ihu.edu.gr//xmlui/handle/11544/759
dc.rights
Default License
dc.title
Christianity in the Western Black Sea area
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heal.type
masterThesis
heal.secondaryTitle
Paleochristian art and architecture in Scythia Minor, within the West Pontic context, IV – VI century
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heal.keyword
Christian art and symbolism--Black Sea Coast
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heal.keyword
Dacians--Religion
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heal.keyword
Scythians--Antiquities
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heal.keyword
Moesia--Antiquities, Roman
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heal.keyword
Dissertations, Academic
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heal.language
en
heal.access
free
el
heal.license
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
el
heal.recordProvider
School of Humanities, MA in Black Sea & Eastern Mediterranean Studies
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heal.publicationDate
2012-11
heal.bibliographicCitation
Elefterescu Alexandru Cristian, 2012, Christianity in the western Black Sea area : paleochristian art and architecture in Scythia Minor,within the West Pontic context, IV-VI century, Master's Dissertation, International Hellenic University
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heal.abstract
The period of the so called Late Antiquity is something that captured the mind of many historians. Historiography explained the phenomena and the processes that took place during the IV to VII centuries from all perspectives: political, economical, social and cultural. The Master thesis is an attempt to analyze this process from a cultural and spiritual perspective. It is a presentation of the religious art and architecture of the period in the specific area covered by the Roman provinces of Dacia, Scythia Minor and Moesia Inferior. The research focuses on the Christian artifacts and architecture. From simple vase lids to complicate monastic complexes, all of the material presented is a token of the major changes that took place during those three centuries. It is a period of reshaping of political and ecclesiastic structures, as well as a shift in mentality and thinking. The thesis attempts to incorporate both historical methodology as well as the result of archaeological research.
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heal.tableOfContents
Introduction……………………………………………………………...……………………..11 The novelty and importance of the inquired theme………………………………..……………11 The purpose and objective of the thesis ………….…………………………………………….12 Historiography………………...…………………………………………………………………14 PART I – THE BEGINNING AND DIFUSION OF CHRISTIANITY IN THE BORDER PROVINCES OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE………………………………………………….19 Britannia, Germania Inferior, Gallia……………………………………………………………..22 Germania Superior, Retia, Noricum………..……………………………………………………23 Pannonia Inferior, Superior…………..……………………………………………………….….24 Dalmatia…………………………...………………………………………….………………….25 Moesia Inferior…………………..……………………………………………….………………26 PART II HISTORICAL COMMENT…….…………………………………….…………….33 Sources regarding the spread of Christianity in the area between the Balkan – Carpathian – Pontic region……………………………………………………………………………………..34 The church organization in Dacia and Scythia Minor …………………………………………..40 Cultural and religious integration of Scythia in the Roman world……………....………………43 Theological personalities that originated from Scythia Minor…………….………..……….50 John Cassian……………………………….………………………………….………………….50 Dionysus Exiguus………………………………………………………………………………..52 John Maxentius……………………………………………………………………….………….53 Heterodox authors ………………….………………………………………………………….53 6 Wulfila………………………….………………………………………………………………..54 Auxentius of Durostorum……………………………………………………………….……….55 Maximinus…………………………………………………………………………...…………..56 Palladius of Ratiaria…………………………………………………………..………………….57 Martyrs of Scythia Minor and Dacia………………………………………………………….57 Tomis……………………………………………...……………………………………………..57 Axiopolis…………………………………………..……………………………………………..60 Noviodunum…………………………………….……………………………………………….61 Dinogetia………………………………….…….………………………………………………..61 Halmyris……………………………………….…………………………………………………61 The profile of spiritual life in Scythia Minor………………….…………………………………62 PART III ARCHAEOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION………..………………………….65 Typology of the discovered Christian objects……………………...…………………………67 Objects used in church service ………………. ………………….…………. ………………….67 Amulets……………………………………………………..……………………………………68 Christianized Roman monuments and Christianized common use objects……….…………….69 Christian objects……………………………………………………………….…………………70 The localization in space of the Christian artifacts found in the province of Dacia……………..71 Characteristics presented by the Christian objects…………………………………….…………72 Place of production………………………………………………………………...…………….72 Symbolism……………………………………………………………………………………….74 7 Epigraphic material………………….………………………………………..………………..77 Christian cult edifices……………………..………………………………………..…………..80 Types of basilicas. Basilicas with crypt……………………...………………………….……………..82 Axiopolis…………………………………………………………………………………………82 Beroe……………………………………………………………….…………………………….82 Capidava………………………………………………………...……………………………….83 Halmyris…………………………………………………….……………………………………83 Histria……………………………….. …………………………………………………………..83 Niculiţel……. ……………………………………………………………………………………84 Tomis…………………………………………………………………………………………….85 Tropaeum Traiani……………………………………..………………………………………….86 Carevec Colin……. ………………………………….………………………………………….86 Basilicas without crypt……………………………………..……………………………………………..87 The Intra – muros basilicas. Scythia Minor. …………………………….……………….……88 Argamum………………………………………………………………………………...………88 Axiopolis, Callatis, Capidava, Dinogetia………………………………………………….……..89 Ibida, Halmyris, Histria………………………………………………………………….……….90 Niculiţel, Noviodunum, Ovidiu……………………………………………………...…………..91 Sucidava, Tomis, Troesmis, …………………………………………………………..…………92 Tropaeum Traiani, Ulmetum…………………………………………………………………….93 Dacia………………………………………………………………………………….………….93 8 Izvoarele……………………………………………………...…………………………………..93 Sucidava………………………………………………………………………………………….94 Moesia Superior and Moesia Inferior …………………….……………………………………..94 Abritus……………………………………………...…………………………………..………..94 Carevec Colin, Doljani, Durostorum, Felix Romuliana, Gradina, Justiniana Prima…………….95 Klisura, Mesembria, Novae, Oescus, Remesiana …………………………………………...…..96 Rijeka, Sirmium, Smorna, Taliata, Sobari……………………………………………………….97 The extra – muros basilicas. Scythia Minor………………………………………….…………..97 Histria……………………………………………………………………………….……………97 Viminacium……………………………………………………………………..………………..98 Adaptation of basilicas. Dacia. ………………….……………………………...……………..98 Slăveni…………………………………………………………………………………...………98 Scythia Minor…………………………………………………………………………………………….98 Teliţa – Amza……………………………………………………………………….……………98 Conclusions……………………………………………………………………………..…...…100 Annex I – Gnostic objects. ……………………………………………………….....…………103 Annex II – Christian inscriptions from Dacia, Scythia Minor and Moesia Inferior ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………106 Bibliography………………………………………………………………………..…………..109 Index of terms …………………………………………………………………………………117 Images, plans and maps…… …………………………………………………………………..120
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heal.advisorName
Mentzos, Professor Dr. Aristotelis
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heal.committeeMemberName
Mentzos, A.
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heal.committeeMemberName
Paisidou, Ass. Prof. Melina
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heal.committeeMemberName
Poulou, Ass. Prof. Natalia
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heal.academicPublisher
School of Humanities, MA in Black Sea & Eastern Mediterranean Studies
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heal.academicPublisherID
ihu
heal.numberOfPages
137
heal.fullTextAvailability
false


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