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dc.contributor.author
Kartali, Athanasia
en
dc.date.accessioned
2015-07-06T12:59:12Z
dc.date.available
2015-09-27T06:05:21Z
dc.date.issued
2015-07-06
dc.identifier.uri
https://repository.ihu.edu.gr//xmlui/handle/11544/769
dc.rights
Default License
dc.title
The Greek-Thracian Relations and the Hellenization of Thrace from the Archaic to the Late Classical period
en
heal.type
masterThesis
heal.keyword
Greeks--Thrace--History
en
heal.keyword
Thracians--Greece--History
en
heal.keyword
Dissertations, Academic
en
heal.language
en
heal.access
free
el
heal.license
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0
el
heal.recordProvider
School of Humanities, MA in Black Sea & Eastern Mediterranean Studies
el
heal.publicationDate
2012-11
heal.bibliographicCitation
Kartali Athanasia, 2012, The greek-thracian relations and the hellenization of Thrace from the archaic to the late classical period ,Master's Dissertation, International Hellenic University
en
heal.abstract
The purpose of the present Master thesis is to describe the Greek‐Thracian relations and to investigate the extent of the subsequent Hellenization of the indigenous population in Thrace. Specifically, it focuses on the chronological periods between the Archaic and Late Classical era. This research supports that the Greek colonial movement towards the Thracian area, starting from the Archaic period onwards, was the stimulus that activated the familiarization of the natives with the Greek culture. The next catalytic event in the history of the examined area was the emergence of a centralized political power, the Odrysian kingdom, after the Persian failure in 480 B.C. (ca. the middle of the 5th century B.C.). The Odrysian kings, who favored the presence of the Greek colonies in their territory, established official state relations with the mainland Greece and consequently, were involved actively to the Greek historical scene. The consequent political‐diplomatic, economic‐commercial and social interactions between the local population and the Greeks constitute the basic factors for the diffusion of the Greek culture in the Thracian area. These arguments are supported by the available ancient literary sources and archaeological material, which substantiate the various forms in which this process was manifested. The next phase for the Thracian history was initiated with the subjugation of the examined area to the Macedonians (341 B.C.). During this era, the penetration of the Greek culture towards the Thracian hinterland was favored by the establishment of settlements in the interior. This transitional phase in Thrace was marked by the amplification of the Hellenization process and the inclusion of those who took part in it, regardless of their origin, into the Greek world. However, the results of this process became definitive during the next historical period, the Roman era.
en
heal.tableOfContents
Abstract ............................................................................................................................ 5 Prologue ........................................................................................................................... 6 Introduction ..................................................................................................................... 8 Ancient Thrace and the Thracians ................................................................................ 10 Introduction ............................................................................................................... 10 The area of ancient Thrace ........................................................................................ 14 Historical Overview (Archaic to the Late Classical period) ........................................ 15 The Greek perception of the Thracians ..................................................................... 24 The establishment of the Greek settlements in Thrace ............................................... 35 Settlements in Thasos, the lower Strymon Valley and the Thacian peraia ............... 36 Abdera, Dikaia and Maroneia .................................................................................... 40 Samothrace and its Peraia ......................................................................................... 43 Doriskos and Ainos ..................................................................................................... 45 The Thracian Chersonese and the Propontis ............................................................. 46 The Black Sea colonies ............................................................................................... 48 The main factors that favored the Hellenization of Thrace ......................................... 55 The Greek colonies ..................................................................................................... 55 The road and water network in Thrace ..................................................................... 60 The commercial relations ........................................................................................... 62 The diplomatic‐political relations .............................................................................. 67 The social interactions ............................................................................................... 73 The demographic changes in Thrace ......................................................................... 76 The factors that limited the extent of the Hellenization process .............................. 77 The impact of the Hellenization process through various forms of expression ......... 83 Institutions ................................................................................................................. 83 Cults ............................................................................................................................ 87 Art ............................................................................................................................... 90 Language .................................................................................................................... 95 Epilogue ....................................................................................................................... 101 4 | P a g e Bibliography ................................................................................................................. 103 In English .................................................................................................................. 103 In Greek .................................................................................................................... 108 Appendix ...................................................................................................................... 109 Sources of Illustrations ............................................................................................. 109
en
heal.advisorName
Xydopoulos, Prof. I.
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Xydopoulos, Ass. Prof. I.
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Nigdelis, Prof. Pantelis
en
heal.committeeMemberName
Manoledakis, Lec. Manolis
en
heal.academicPublisher
School of Humanities, MA in Black Sea & Eastern Mediterranean Studies
en
heal.academicPublisherID
ihu
heal.numberOfPages
110
heal.fullTextAvailability
false


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